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Hawaiian voyaging canoes Hōkūle‘a and Hikianalia set off around the world

HOKULEA logo
With the constant stream of traditional boat information flowing across the editorial desks here at Chine bLog, and the regular postings that come out of that stream [cough cough], we can sometimes lose a great story for a short bit. So it was with a quite interesting post by National Geographic about the Hawaiian voyaging canoes Hōkūle‘a and Hikianalia, which recently set off on a four-year, round-the-world voyage to showcase the boats and the culture behind them, as well as message of ocean conservation and sustainability. The voyage will fully utilize only traditional wayfinding navigation, even beyond the Pacific.

Hōkūle‘a has been on my radar for a while. Mrs. Chine bLog and I honeymooned on Kauai, HI, and she happened to be in port when we were headed out diving one day. The dive guys noted that she was an important vessel, and I definitely admired her, but I didn’t think too much of the encounter thereafter. A few years ago, then, I read Sailing in the Wake of the Ancestors: Reviving Polynesian Voyaging (Legacy of Excellence), an account of the early voyages of a set of replica Polynesian voyaging canoes, focusing, in particular, on Hōkūle‘a (good read, by the way). It was only then that I realized what we had happened upon that day on Kauai and wished I had spent more time trying to check the boat out.

Back to NatGeo’s post: it is a good overview of the voyage and its goals and also links to some nice related resources. You can find a map of the voyage and links to the Pacific Voyaging Society‘s site, where you can learn more about the voyage and support it in multiple ways. Finally, there is a nice explanation of wayfinding by Nainoa Thompson, President of Pacific Voyaging Society and navigator on past Hōkūle‘a voyages. Thompson learned from master Micronesian navigator Mau Piailug.

Great stuff here that is well worth checking out.

#MalamaHonua #WorldwideVoyage #Hokulea

Four great new boats from the desk of Klaus Schmitt

Our friend Klaus Schmitt wrote again with four new boats showing his delightful ability to blend traditional workboats and yachts. This collection includes a sweet little cruiser he calls “34′ Double-ender,” a catboat done for a friend called KAT (quick: guess the friend’s name!), a tug-yacht and a trawler-yacht. Great, great stuff, as always.

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I hope someone will build one of these. These designs need to have real water under their keels!

The Charles W. Morgan sails again – the trip home

CHARLES W. MORGANWhen there is breaking action in the traditional / classic / historical boat world, you can expect Chine bLog to be on the scene. Well, sometimes. We may even write a timely post about it. It so happened, though, that when the last surviving whaling vessel and oldest commercial ship still afloat (launched in 1841), Mystic Seaport‘s CHARLES W. MORGAN, sailed down Vineyard Sound and across Buzzard’s Bay to its port of birth, New Bedford, MA, we were there. As you may know, the Seaport recently completed an extensive renovation of the MORGAN (video), and she is, as I write, touring southeaster New England, again on her home waters after many years tied to a pier.

After an initial trip to Martha’s Vineyard, the MORGAN headed for New Bedford on June 24th. She came down Vineyard Sound under tow, crossing to Buzzard’s Bay via the wide and deep Quick’s Hole, between Nashewena and Pasque islands. Emerging into the Bay, she set sails and crossed to New Bedford as she should, under canvas. Happily, we could be there alongside her for this part of the journey due to the initiative of Captain Jono Billings of the M/V CUTTYHUNK, who ran a special trip to see this historic voyage. Some pictures of the ship, the setting of sails, and the free-sailing MORGAN are below. Continue reading The Charles W. Morgan sails again – the trip home »

Update from the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum boatyard on the ROSIE PARKS

Skipjack under repair When I have been out to the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum I have kept tabs on the restoration of the skipjack ROSIE PARKS. Longtime readers first saw pictures of her in tough shape in 2007 (see right).

By this time last year, there was much better news to report: ROSIE PARKS was well along in a proper restoration. The other day, happily, I found her where she belongs: in the water and looking sharp. Here’s to a great job by the Museum waterfront staff!

ROSIE PARKS afloat

Fascinating “This American Life” piece on the launch of underwater archeology

Our colleague Andrew Cohen popped in the other day asking if we heard a This American Life episode that re-aired recently about “shipwrecks or something.” We had not and he was good enough to send it. What we got was a fascinating fifteen or so minutes hearing about two men who basically created underwater archeology starting in the late 1960s. One took a chance dive on a wreck in Turkey and, 50 years later, they are still unraveling clues about what they came to discover was an important Byzantine ship. Along the way the rewrote our understanding of Byzantine shipbuilding and commerce. This story is definitely worth a listen.

A nice collection of traditonal boats from Vietnam

Chine bLog friend David Witzel was recently in Vietnam with his family and agreed to serve as a special corespondent for us, capturing pictures of traditional Vietnamese boats. Happily, he found some nice ones. We don’t have the backstory on them, but they are nice to study anyway.

Mekong River
River craft from along the Mekong, including a ferry and perhaps some liveaboards.

Vietnamese long boats on the Mekong

The ferry looks like she might be wooden Continue reading A nice collection of traditonal boats from Vietnam »

The story of the last Pacific-crossing balsa raft

We turned on NPR‘s Morning Edition this morning just in time to catch the tail end of a story referencing a balsa raft in Australia tied to a historic voyage.Mental note made to look up the piece made, we went on with the day. The story was “Australia Celebrates A World-Record Ocean Crossing.” It tells of a crew of men who successfully crossed the Pacific, from Ecuador to Australia, in balsa rafts in 1973. The voyage, though it shattered records, promptly become unknown. We had never heard of it and we read about such things. The locals in the small town in New South Wales, Australia where the rafts landed ultimately saved one of the three rafts (actually they rebuilt one from the remains of the final two) and made a museum around it, but it has not been promoted. Fascinating and worth a quick listen.

Unbelievably amazing traditional boat resource from Italy

Big hat-tip here to our friend Carl Cramer, publisher of Wooden Boat and author of its My Wooden Boat of the Week blog – his entry today, drawings of Indonesian outrigger canoes, was great in-and-of itself. Carl was, though, good enough to provide the source site, a resource from Italy which can be roughly (per Google) translated as “Pages dedicated to the Navy and Merchant Navy and seafaring ethnic and historical.” It isn’t clear to me who is behind this site, but – my word! – what a treasure the site owners have amassed!

The site groups sets of resources – I take it many are drawings, but I haven’t browsed very deeply – in sensible clusters that revolve around time period and location. We were drawn to the second section, “Etnografia: i natanti nel mondo,” which we can tell you, senza Google, is “Boats of the World.” We literally don’t know what to show you as a sample – there are so many cool boats to point out. There are drawing sets for every corner of the planet, as far as we can tell, and there are many per set. The set from Indochina Carl references has 299 – 299! – drawings, mostly from Indonesia, the Philippines, and Vietnam. Try these, for starters:

Indonesian outrigger canoe wiht Indonesian boat Sailing ship form Sumatra Vietnamese boat from Saigon

And that is just one region! There are 325 from Africa, including some amazing lateen craft from the northern and eastern sides of the continent:

Egyptian lateen craft Small Somali sailing vessel Sailing outrigger from Mozambique Long canoe of the Niger

I could go on, e.g., this set of 494 from mainland East Asia. Did we say this collection is mindblowing? ’cause it’s mindblowing. Check out the site and the full-sized images. It is fantastic.

Fun chance meeting with photographer Ellen Tynan

Last weekend we were out for a hikelet along the Potomac river and happened upon a woman enjoying the view of the marsh. We got talking and she mentioned, in particular, my Wooden Boat hat. She then revealed that she was a photographer who specialized in classic and traditional boats, and she noted she had been published in the magazine. Her name is Ellen Tynan and, on review, I am sure I have seen her work (also on Flickr).

She is hoping to publish a book in the not-too-distant future: “Boat Lines.” It will compile her photos of traditional boats from six regions of the world: Maori New Zealand, Ireland, Alaska and British Columbia, Peru, Indonesia, and Egypt. Good sampling, there, eh?

I’d suggest browsing through her work and getting a sneak peak at what might be in the book. A quick selection of works that jumped out at us, here at Chine bLog, includes (will open in new tabs/windows):

There are many more great ones. It would be well worth your time to browse them all on your own. Keep an eye out for this great sounding book.

An update on the restoration of the skipjack ROSIE PARKS

The Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum has a great fleet and will be the better for adding the restored skipjack, ROSIE PARKS. I have blogged about her before and the museum does a nice job of tracking the update in its blog. I checked in on her while I was there. She’s coming along nicely.

Skipjack ROSIE PARKS

See the “before” pictures in this post from 2007.